Author Archives: Yenka

Shares of The Stars Group Soar Over 14% After Deal is Announced

Analysts and the market in general have applauded The Stars Group’s proposed takeover of Skybetting + Gaming, as shares of the Judi Online parent company traded up over 14% on the NASDAQ today to close at $33.45.

As a result of the market’s positive reaction to the deal, The Stars Group Inc., which has a portfolio of assets that includes Pokerstars and the European Poker Tour, is now valued at slightly more than $5 billion USD.

Any worries about the debt that The Stars Group is taking on (they are borrowing roughly $6 billion to close the deal) is being downplayed by investors, as there seems to be more excitement about the possible synergies between the two companies, as well as the balanced poker/sports betting/casino mix that The Stars Group Inc. will enjoy once the transaction closes.

Pokerstars had previously tried to purchase William Hill, though some of those company’s biggest shareholders ended up scuttling the deal, as they were reportedly worried about Pokerstars’ stagnating online poker revenue and the high amounts of debt that the combined company would incur to close the deal. The deal for Skybetting + Gaming has a large cash component, so those shareholders will not have the same worries.

This deal marks a continuation of the UK acquisitions that we’ve seen in recent months and years. With Pokerstars agreeing to purchase Skybetting + Gaming and GVC having purchased Ladbrokes Coral, there are less and less UK-focused independent companies remaining. With all of the overtures made over the past few years towards the company, you would have to think that William Hill is likely in play again, though the number of interested companies continues to dwindle, as many of the bigger firms have already found willing partners.

DEGREES OF SEPARATION – HOW FAR AHEAD IS YOUR POKER THINKING

We all have those moments where we know what someone else is thinking. Sometimes it’s a friend, family member or a complete stranger, but there’s a moment when you know what they’re thinking. But sometimes we don’t have a clue what someone else is thinking, and further there are other times when we think we know what someone else is thinking, but we think we know what they think we are thinking about Situs Poker Online. If you’re confused, you’re quite right to be.

In chess, it’s said that some grand masters imagine 10 to 15 moves ahead, which means they calculate every possible move they and their opponent could make for 10 to 15 moves ahead of their current position. That’s some forward thought and planning! However, chess is a perfect game – at any point, both players know exactly the lay of the land – they know who is in what position and can (in theory) work out every possible move from that point to the end of the game.

But the game we love most – Poker – is an imperfect information game, and therefore more nuanced than many other games. We have to guess what cards the other players may have. But then we have to think about what we want our opponents to think we have… OK, let’s keep it simple…

Novice poker players think about the hand they have, and what they should do based on that combination. When they don’t have a strong hand, they think about bluffing.

Experts believe there are actually six levels to poker playing.

The first level is someone who doesn’t know anything about poker, and importantly doesn’t claim to know anything about poker (we all know players who claim to know about poker and don’t, and players who claim not to know about poker and do!).

The second level is the one we mentioned above – the player who knows what their hand is, but doesn’t think beyond that.

Level three is a big group, with many players in here. If you think at this level, you wonder what your opponent has. Players know what hands are better than others, so they weigh up the idea of what someone else might have without knowing the range of complicated possible options.

In level four you start thinking outside of the standard pattern of knowing what you have and wondering what the other players have. You go one step further which is thinking about what the other players think you have, and playing in a way that continues that belief. This is the root of successful bluffing, but the levels don’t stop here, oh no.

Level five becomes a bit of a mind-bender, because players thinking at this level are asking themselves, “What do the other players think I think they have?” This is starting to feel a little bit like Inception, isn’t it? This kind of thinking is where experienced players can really make some great wins because they are able to give off the impression they have a certain kind of hand, all the while considering their options of what the other players have, and playing accordingly.

The final level is for top-level players, and is the next step in the process, going one step further. “What do the other players think I think they think I think they have?” Yes, there are too many ‘thinks’ in that question, and it’s not a surprise that almost no one really operates on this level.

Airplane Wing Assembles Like a Jigsaw Puzzle and Can Morph Into Any Shape

A new type of airplane wing assembled like a jigsaw puzzle could make for lighter, more efficient aircraft.

NASA and Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers tested the wing design in a NASA wind tunnel, where the technology performed better than expected, Iphone Cases, one of the wing’s developers and a graduate student at MIT, said in a statement. The new wing is light and flexible, able to adjust its shape midflight depending on the needs of the pilot.

“You can make any geometry you want and LG Cases,” Jenett said. [Supersonic! The 11 Fastest Military Planes]

Conventional airplane wings are made of metal and composite materials, so they’re fairly heave
The lattice-like wing is covered with a thin sheet of polymer and has a density of just 3.8 lbs. per cubic foot (5.6 kilograms per cubic meter).

But lightness isn’t the only advantage of the new wing design. It’s also flexible. By strategically placing stiff and flexible components in the lattice pattern, the researchers can build a wing that changes shape in response to the stresses around it. Instead of having to lift a flap or move an aileron, a pilot could simply maneuver the plane, and the wing would change shape automatically.

“We’re able to gain efficiency by matching the shape to the loads at different angles of attack,” study leader Nicholas Cramer, a research computer scientist at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, said in the statement. “We’re able to produce the exact same behavior you would do actively, but we did it passively.”

Trump prepares a new fall offensive: Branding Kamala Harris

President Donald Trump has long excelled at ridiculing opponents and fomenting rivalries among those around him — from contestants on “The Apprentice” to his top aides inside the White House. Now he and his campaign are eyeing ways to drive a wedge between Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his younger, lesser-known running mate.

The president and his allies are plotting ways to portray Harris as a serious threat to the working-class voters whom Biden hopes to flip this fall, four years after many across the Rust Belt ditched Democrats to support Trump. They’re digging up her comments from Democratic primary debates, hoping they can use them to put her and Biden on defense. And despite Harris’ lukewarm relationship with some anti-establishment progressive groups, they are considering ways to cast her as a champion of the radical left by concentrating on positions she’s taken that run afoul of Biden-style centrism, one of the former vice president’s key appeals to swing voters.

“Kamala Harris is a California liberal who has already defined herself as a radical Democrat with her support of the Green New Deal, socialized medicine, fracking bans, tax raises and taxpayer-funded abortions,” said Courtney Parella, deputy national press secretary for the Trump campaign.

Some of those attacks will be dismissed as false or exaggerated. But the move to cast Harris as a socialist sympathizer and progressive stalwart comes as the Trump campaign struggles to deploy a similar playbook against Biden, who has mocked the president’s attempts to paint him as a “helpless puppet” of the radical left. Trump’s standing against Biden in polls has barely budged throughout the year despite nickname after nickname, a flurry of vicious tweets and numerous presidential press conferences that he’s used to assail his opponent.

“Do I look to you like a radical socialist with a soft spot for rioters?” Biden asked the crowd on Monday at an event in Pittsburgh, where he distanced himself from calls to ban hydraulic fracking and condemned the rioting, looting and arson occurring in some U.S. cities.

Could LeBron James Defeat Donald Trump?

hen the National Basketball Association’s players walked off the court en masse last week to protest the shooting of Jacob Blake by police in Kenosha, Wisconsin, the move was so unprecedented that writers couldn’t decide on what to call it. Was it a “boycott”? A plain old “strike?” Or, more specifically, a “wildcat strike”?

The semantics are less important than the substance. As ESPN’s Domonique Foxworthy recently pointed out, “kneeling doesn’t make anybody uncomfortable anymore.” The NBA was already the league’s most overtly activist league, but the post-Kenosha climate forced its (predominantly Black) players beyond symbolic gestures to a standoff that’s rolled up corporate bottom lines, the largest social justice movement since the civil rights era, and a presidential election into a debate so hot-button it’s practically nuclear. The tense 48 hours that followed the beginning of the strike saw players threatening to end the already precarious playoffs, accosting the head of the players’ union, and consulting with former President Barack Obama on the uncomfortable realpolitik of social justice in Donald Trump’s America.
After all that, the players secured a series of concessions that include a new league-sponsored “social justice coalition,” an agreement that team and arena owners would work to convert their stadiums into “mass-voting locations” this November, and the production of new ads “promoting civic engagement in local and national elections and raising awareness about voter access and opportunity.”

Such measures aren’t just PR sops meant to placate the “shut up and dribble” crowd. The world of sports broadcasting is notoriously gun-shy when it comes to politics — even when those expressions of political belief are symbolic rather than electoral. All of which makes what NBA players have accomplished here unprecedented.

As the coronavirus pandemic and voter suppression tactics threaten to depress turnout in the very cities across America that have been rocked by the violence and injustice, the NBA will expand voting access and participation. The stadiums that will double as polling stations aren’t just in safely blue states, they’re in places with down-ballot and Electoral College ramifications—Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, Arizona, Texas, North Carolina, Georgia.

In light of the strike’s shocking nature and its just-as-shockingly quick resolution, it’s easy to miss the elegant genius of what it accomplished. For all their carping about voter fraud, Trump and his Greek chorus in conservative media are hard-pressed to argue against measures to promote in-person voting. Or, now that players are back on the court, to complain about spoiled millionaires hypocritically shirking their duties while the poor, average fan suffers through quarantine with nothing to keep them company but Formula 1 on tape delay.

The NBA playoffs resumed seamlessly this week, but the decision wasn’t without its critics on the left—specifically with regard to the influence of Barack Obama, the Bernie-verse’s bugbear of perceived half-stepping. When the news broke that Obama counseled players to return to the court with concessions, responses ranged from “are you fucking kidding me” to jokes about Larry Summers and Richard Branson to the evergreen, sarcastic “thanks obama.”

Michigan secretary of state warns Election Day could be Election Week

Michigan’s secretary of state said on Sunday her state’s full results of the Nov. 3 elections won’t be available on Election Day, advising voters it could take a week for a final tally.

“We should be prepared for this to be closer to an election week as opposed to an election day,” Jocelyn Benson said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “The bottom line is we are not going to have the full results and a counting of all of our ballots on election night. We already know that. We’ve asked the legislature to make changes to the laws to give us more ability to be prepared and count those ballots more efficiently.”

But Benson added the legislature hasn’t acted on her requests, though her office has increased tabulators and capacity to count ballots. The most important aspect to this year’s elections, she said, is accuracy.

“If it takes a few extra days to ensure we have a full and accurate counting as a result of every race, that’s what it’s going to take,” Benson said. “We’re going to be transparent throughout that whole process to make sure every citizen knows exactly where we are in the counting process and how many more ballots we have to get through.”

She said yes when asked by NBC host Chuck Todd whether she was concerned over candidates being falsely declared as the winner on election night.

“To me, that’s just going to be another example of the type of misinformation and disinformation that we’re seeing multiple ways from multiple platforms and voices in this election cycle,” Benson said. “So, we are going to counter that misinformation with truth and accuracy.”

In Michigan, voters can vote early by mail or return ballots through drop boxes throughout the state. As well, she added voters can vote early in person at a clerk’s office and that every precinct will be open on Election Day.

“We’ve been able to hone this plan for November through three successful elections that we’ve had already this year where we’ve seen in every single one, turnout has doubled, putting us on track to have Michigan’s November election be the highest turnout ever in the history of our state,” Benson explained.

Benson noted she’s been in communication with Postmaster General Louis DeJoy and postal leaders in Michigan. Along with working to amp up mail-in voting, Benson said she’s also dealing with the voter’s perception.

“The changes in the postal service, if nothing else, have created confusion and chaos where none existed prior,” Benson said. “So, the voter education and the confidence boosting we now have to do and will do to ensure voters feel confident that their vote is counted is a key part of our work moving forward.”

Hong Kong police arrest 90 at protests over election delay

HONG KONG — At least 90 people were arrested Sunday at protests against the government’s decision to postpone elections for Hong Kong’s legislature, police and a news report said.

The elections were to have taken place Sunday but Chief Executive Carrie Lam on July 31 postponed them for one year. Lam blamed an upsurge in coronavirus cases, but critics said her government worried the opposition would gain seats if voting went ahead on schedule.

Anti-government protests have been held in Hong Kong almost every weekend since June 2019. They erupted over a proposed extradition law and spread to include demands for greater democracy and criticism of Beijing’s efforts to tighten control over the former British colony.

On Sunday, one woman was arrested in the Kowloon district of Yau Ma Tei on charges of assault and spreading pro-independence slogans, the police department said on its Facebook page. It said such slogans are illegal under the newly enacted National Security Act.

The ruling Communist Party’s decision to impose the law in May prompted complaints it was violating the autonomy promised to the territory when it was returned to China in 1997. Washington withdrew trading privileges granted to Hong Kong and other governments suspended extradition and other agreements on the grounds that the territory of 7 million people is no longer autonomous.

Also Sunday, police fired pepper balls at protesters in Kowloon’s Mong Kok neighborhood, the South China Morning Post newspaper reported.

At least 90 people were arrested, most of them on suspicion of illegal assembly, the police department said on a separate social media account.

In the Jordan neighborhood, protesters raised a banner criticizing the election delay, the Post said.

“I want my right to vote!” activist Leung Kwok-hung, popularly known as Long Hair, was quoted as saying. The newspaper said Leung was later arrested.

Trump continues counterattack on military comments

Top administration officials on Sunday said they’ve never heard President Donald Trump make disparaging remarks about veterans or the military, a subtle attempt to dispute a report in The Atlantic. But the president’s top defender was the president himself.

Jeffrey Goldberg, editor-in-chief of The Atlantic, reported last week that Trump in November 2018 told senior staff that the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery near Paris was “filled with losers” and that in a separate conversation he called the 1,800 Marines who died at Belleau Wood “suckers” for getting killed.

Trump was also furious when the White House lowered flags to half-staff following Arizona Sen. John McCain’s death, Goldberg reported, and the president told senior staff that they wouldn’t “support that loser’s funeral,” adding that the war hero “was a f–king loser.” Goldberg reported that Trump made similar comments about President George H.W. Bush, whose plane was shot down during World War II.

The Associated Press, Washington Post, New York Times, CNN and Fox News all confirmed some elements of The Atlantic’s 1,500-word report, but Trump and his allies have denied since Thursday that he made such comments.

On Sunday, Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie credited Trump for what he called a “renaissance” at the VA and grouped the allegations with past stories citing unnamed officials that the president has dismissed as fake news and hoaxes.

“I think anonymous are the same people that brought you fake heart attacks, fake strokes, Russian collusion,” Wilkie told CNN’s Dana Bash on “State of the Union.”

“I see the proof in the pudding,” he added. “The proof in the pudding is our military is stronger, and our Veterans Affairs Department is in a place that it has never been. This is the renaissance, and it’s all because of one man.”

Wilkie downplayed Trump’s past comments toward McCain, whom the president in 2015 said was not a war hero, as “politics” in the “heat of a campaign.” Trump, however, was running for president while McCain was seeking reelection in the Senate.

Harris: ‘We do have two systems of justice in America’

Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris said President Donald Trump and Attorney General William Barr are “spending full time in a different reality“ when it comes to racism in the justice system.

“The reality of America today is what we have seen over generations and, frankly, since our inception, which is we do have two systems of justice in America,” Harris told CNN’s Dana Bash in an interview that aired Sunday on “State of the Union” in response to Barr’s comments that there are not two systems of justice for Black and white Americans.
“I don’t think that most reasonable people who are paying attention to the facts would dispute that there are racial disparities and a system that has engaged in racism,” she added. “There’s no question that we have seen an unacceptable incidence for generations of unarmed Black men being killed. Nobody can deny that.”

In an interview Wednesday on CNN, Barr acknowledged “there are some situations where statistics would suggest” people of color are treated differently than white people but said the justice system was not inherently racist.

Harris, a former prosecutor who served as attorney general of California, also said charges should be considered for the white police officer who shot Jacob Blake, a 29-year-old unarmed Black man, in Kenosha, Wis.

“I am not in full position of the facts of the case,” Harris said. “But based on what I’ve seen, I think that charges very much should be considered and should be considered in a very serious way and that there should be accountability and consequence.”

When asked about the suspension of a group of police officers involved in the suffocation death of a 41-year-old Black man, Daniel Prude, in Rochester, N.Y., Harris said she expects the state’s attorney general to “review all of the evidence and make the appropriate decision.”

Rep. Demings slams Trump on racial equity training, protests

Rep. Val Demings condemned President Donald Trump on Sunday for an order to crack down on federal anti-racism training initiatives.

“We need a commander-in-chief who clearly understands and wants to address racism in all systems,” the Florida Democrat said in ABC’s “This Week. “Until we get to that point, we will continue to see the problems and be plagued by the problems that we’re seeing every day right now.”

In a White House memo from the Office of Management and Budget, Trump is cited for believing anti-racism training in the federal workforce is “divisive” and “anti-American.” Responding, Demings, a former Orlando, Fla., police chief said, “Racism has been the ghost in the room in this country for 400 years.”

“We got to deal with inequality in all things,” she said. “In health care, we see the effects of Covid-19 on Black and brown communities. In education … we know that [the] overwhelming majority of people in our prison systems, for example, are Black and brown, and a majority did not graduate high school. We’ve got to deal with injustices in education, in lending, in housing.”

Asked about the nationwide protests on racism and police brutality, Demings urged peaceful protesting and accountability for looting and violence.

“Our job is to make sure that peaceful protesters are able to exercise their right guaranteed under the First Amendment,” Demings said. “But we also have to make sure that those who break the law, those who exercise violence, regardless of what side of the political aisle that they’re on, must be held accountable.”

Demings slammed Trump for “throwing fire” at protests, agreeing with a recent ABC News/Ipsos poll that most Americans say Trump is making protests and unrest worse.

“While America was going through civil unrest in all 50 states, quite frankly, America was on fire, we had a president, a commander-in-chief, who with us walking around with a gasoline can, not trying to sow peace and calm, but actually throwing fire on an already volatile situation,” Demings said in her interview.